• An ALIF is an operation to fuse spinal levels in the lower lumbar spine. Depending on the number of levels affected, it usually involves one or two spinal levels.

  • An ACDF is an operation to fuse spinal levels in the front of the neck. The operation is usually done to relieve pressure on the spinal nerves or spinal cord from a herniated disc.

  • This procedure replaces a degenerative or damaged spinal disc with an implant designed to preserve motion in your neck. This procedure can relieve the pain of compressed nerves in the cervical spine.

  • A cervical disc replacement is an operation to replace one or two levels of the cervical spine. The operation is usually done to relieve pressure on the spinal nerves or spinal cord from a herniated disc.

  • Cervical laminoplasty is a procedure to open the spinal canal from the back of the cervical spine. The operation is usually done to relieve pressure on the spinal cord at multiple levels of the spine.

  • An XLIF® is a procedure to fuse vertebrae in the lumbar spine together. Sometimes, the best way to fuse lumbar vertebrae together is from a lateral approach.

  • Kyphoplasty is an operation in which cement is injected in a vertebra. This is done to treat a compression fracture of the vertebral body.

  • This procedure relieves pressure on the nerve roots in the spine. It is most commonly performed to relieve the pain of stenosis.

  • This procedure removes a section of bone from the rear of one or more vertebrae to relieve the painful and disabling pressure of stenosis. The spine is then stabilized with rods and screws.

  • A lumbar decompression is a procedure to remove bone or soft tissue from the lumbar spine that is pressing on spinal nerves.

  • A lumbar fusion is a procedure to permanently fuse one or more of the spinal vertebra together. This is performed in conditions where the spine is unstable and causing pain or other symptoms.

  • A lumbar microdiscectomy is a procedure to remove a herniated disc that may be pressing on spinal nerves and causing pain or other symptoms.

  • For many patients, a minimally invasive procedure may be an option. The most common minimally invasive fusion method is an MIS TLIF, or minimally invasive (surgery) transforaminal interbody fusion.

  • The vast majority of spine problems will not require an operation. For nearly all conditions, the risks of nonsurgical treatment are significantly less than having an operation.

  • A posterior cervical fusion is a procedure to fuse vertebra(e) in the cervical spine. It is often accompanied by a laminectomy or decompression to relieve pressure on the spinal cord.

  • The sacroiliac joint, or SI joint, is the place where the sacrum (the bottom vertebrae of the spine) meets the ilium, or the wing-shaped bones of the pelvis. In normal circumstances, the joint moves only a few degrees in any one direction.

  • Spinal cord stimulation (also called SCS) uses electrical impulses to relieve chronic pain of the back, arms and legs.

  • A spinal cord stimulator is a medical device that delivers a mild electric charge to the spinal nerves. It can be used anywhere in the spinal column.

  • In many spinal surgeries, two or more vertebral bones are permanently joined with a technique called "spinal fusion." A fusion creates a solid mass of bone. It stabilizes your spine.